Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Pick One- I can't!!

Pick one song/album, book, or movie that you think defines the overall work of a particular artist. More than just “What’s their best song/movie/book?”, this feature asks writers to take a stand and argue for a defining moment that speaks to entire career, potential controversy and all.

This is the task set on http://www.popmatters.com/, but applying it to Adam Ant, either with the Ants or solo, I can't do it. Each album is distinctive in it's own way, and for an Ant fan is equally as important and the others. Not one in my opinion defines the Ants sound or overall work.
Some might argue that Kings of the Wild Frontier is the one, but that is only part of the story and misses the darkness of Dirk Wears White Socks, the pop glamour of Prince Charming, the rockabilly/rock n roll/ of Friend or Foe, the pop sheen of Strip, the rock n roll/ TRextasy of Vive le Rock, even the dance moves of Manners and Physique and the AOR of Wonderful deserve a look in. And for me the B Sides on the B sides compilation B Side Babies are as essential as any album, and it's criminal they were left off of AntBox, which should have been a more encompassing Boc Set, not a best of with a few goodies added. But that's for another post!

The point is this: Not one of Adam's albums defines his overall work. Nor does one song. One song defines a particular era- Dog Eat Dog perhaps defines the Kings era, Prince Charming the next, etc etc....

I find that I want to get this Ant stuff out of my system, but I have a feeling it won't ever go away, even if I write the damn book I have inside me!

1 comment:

Allen L. said...

Kings. It defined not only the look he is best known for but it is considered a landmark album of the "New Wave" era. There's cheeky fun stuff (Jolly Roger) Poison Pen (Press Darlings), danger (Feed me to the Lions, Ants Invasion) pop (Antmusic, Kings, Dog eat Dog). It's perfect. He would never again be that cohesive or have that much of an impact. You can look back on that record and understand the collision of art and commerce of the New Wave.